The Illegitimate Book Reviewers And How to Spot Them

The author needs book reviews to sell their books, and of course they want great. Authors who study their expertise, conduct research, and produce quality and well-written books, deserve good support, and by putting the right time and effort, such writers usually receive praise from reviewers. But even good books can accept bad reviews – and I don’t mean reviews that say negative things about books. I am talking about what is written by people who do not qualify, no matter how valuable, to write it down. Why don’t they qualify? Because they don’t read books.

Let’s face it. Books are businesses, and reviewers know the authors need them. Free reviews are becoming increasingly difficult to find. Reviewers are now paid for their services, and they should; their time is valuable, and reading books and writing decent reviews can take hours. The author must be prepared to pay for the service and to realize that it is a business investment, such as advertising and marketing, where money is invested in the hope of generating book sales.

But irresponsible people – let’s say they are illegitimate book reviewers – are willing to prey on the needs of the writers. They realize that they can make money from an author without providing legitimate services. Let’s say you make $ 100 for each book you review, and you need eight hours to read a book. That’s $ 100 a day. But isn’t it good to make $ 200 or $ 400 or $ 1,200 a day? What if, instead of reading a book, you just took it, or did you just spit out what the back cover said? Think about how much counterfeit money you can make, and how much money you can make, while giving the writer what they want. So what if the review is only four sentences? As long as you give it five stars on Amazon, the author will be happy, right? Cha-ching!

Unfortunately, yes, in many cases, the author is happy. But most of them are self-publishing writers for businesses who are fortunate to get accurate descriptions of their books. I already know many writers like that are raving about how their books are rated by one of these “honorable” or “top” reviewers, often close to the top ranks on Amazon.

Initially when I started offering book reviews, I realized that there was no way I would ever rank in the Top 10 Amazon, not because my reviews didn’t have quality or I didn’t cover the book enough, but just because I wasn’t a robot, and I actually read books . If you look at the list of Amazon’s top Amazon reviewers, many of them have reviewed more than 5,000 books. If you are a service with several staff reviewers, that number is understandable, but most of the top ranks are individuals. How could this happen? Even if it’s your full-time job and you can read books a day, or even two books a day, it’s only ten weeks or about five hundred a year. You have to review on Amazon for ten years to break 5,000. Okay, I think it’s possible, but look at some of the top ones on Amazon. Some of them have been posted up to fifteen books a day. Yes, some of them are legal and write quality articles, so I don’t mean to underestimate those people.

Indeed, some of these people may be speed readers, but the jury is still out on the legitimacy of reading speed. I have a friend who claims to be a speed reader. I gave him three mystery novels to read that he returned to me the next day. When I asked him if he already knew who the killer was in a book, he could not remember “whodunit.” If you read very fast you can’t maintain the basic flow, you don’t really read a book.

Even worse, some of these papers have nothing to say that an author can even use them. I have seen some that are only three or four sentence summary plots without anything that says the book is “good, good, interesting, or not to be missed.” An author cannot get a description for the back cover if the review only summarizes but does not assess the quality of the book.

Even worse, much of what the authors expect will be useful support for their books to end, because books are not read but text is quickly rewritten from the back cover, with misspelled character names, factual errors about the plot, and sometimes sometimes even mistakes about the theme, content, and all points of the book – all the dead gifts of a book are never read. Sometimes a plot summary then only produces confusion, and if a reader is confused, he won’t buy a book or spend his time reading it.

Some writers may not care about such details. If the reviews are good, it’s good enough to sell books, right? But if it’s misleading, readers won’t be happy when the book they buy doesn’t reflect what is said about them. Hopefully, when readers have that experience, they will know better than trusting the reviewer again.

Unfortunately, as long as money is involved, unauthorized reviewers will not leave anytime soon. But as a paying author, you have the right to read your book. Most writers, including myself, want legitimate feedback about what readers think about our books. We write our books as much as to entertain, inform, educate, or invoke emotional responses from our readers as we did to sell several books. As writers, we have the right to get better.

So what can the author do about this situation? I don’t see any point in being angry about this situation because I don’t think it will change anything. You can write to these people and complain, but it’s impossible to do good. Some things you can do are:

1 Do Your Research. Look at the history of the reviewers and what they have written in the past. How well is their work written – is it more than just a plot summary? Ask yourself whether it is worth your time and money to pay for such services, or even just pay shipping fees and give free books to such individuals.
2 Request Correction. If you review it, and the report has an error such as a misspelled character name or the book is incorrectly listed as a sequel to your last book, contact the individual and request that the correction be made. I have known several writers who have successfully corrected — especially when they paid for the initial work.
3 Sounds. Every review posted to Amazon gives you the opportunity to choose whether or not it helps you. Review ratings are not only based on how many posts they have. While finding out how Amazon ranks this remains a mystery, assessments affect rankings. Voting may not help or hurt a reviewer a lot, but it is better than nothing.
4 Learn from Experience. You have studied your lesson, and that may not be a difficult lesson, but you now know in the future to stay away from these immoral people. If you are traditionally published, your publisher might use such a review but you can ask otherwise. However, remember that publishing is a business and that makes it a dollar game; Unfortunately, an accurate representation of your book may not be as important as your publisher to make money.
5 Share Your Knowledge. Share with your colleagues your experience. That does not mean you are gossiping about reviewers. You help other writers make legitimate business decisions about how to spend their money. Legitimate business decisions may not end with illegal results.

Many good book reviewers are out there. Find them and build lasting relationships with them; then you don’t need to rely on the unauthorized to find readers and sell your books.

Fake Online Book Reviews and How to Avoid Them

Print publications continue to discontinue running book reviews and are even going out of business as more and more readers turn to the Internet to get their information. In the past, advertising in print publications covered the cost of book reviews, but today, authors generally have to pay for publicity packages to receive book reviews, or give a nominal fee to compensate the reviewer for his or her time.

The result is that people can make money off writing book reviews, and some so-called reviewers are doing so without actually reading the books. Why would anyone write a fake book review? Because it takes many hours to read a book, and the more book reviews you can write, the more money you can make, so why not just save time by not reading the books and instead just write the reviews and collect the payments so you can make more money. Trust me; this situation happens all the time.

Other reviewers do not charge for reviews but they request multiple copies of books. Why do they need multiple copies when they don’t read those books? So they can resell them online and make more money while writing fake reviews.

But won’t people catch on to these fake reviews? Yes, most people should, but not everyone does. Most of these fake reviewers consist of the so-called reviewer copying and paraphrasing what’s on the back cover and then adding some flowery caveat like “This book is a must-read for its thrilling action” or “An enjoyable and moving love story you won’t want to miss” to make it look like the reviewer actually read the book. Of course, whether the book is thrilling or enjoyable or not, the reviewer has no idea-he may not even have cracked open the book.

So how can you as an author, who wants legitimate reviews, or as a reader wanting a good book to read, actually tell if a review is legitimate? Here are five simple guidelines for spotting fake book reviews:

Ignore reviews written by authors, their friends, and family:I cringe whenever I see a five star review written by the author; usually it’s done under the guise of the author wanting to provide readers with more information about the book, but the place for that is in the product description. Any author who gives his own book five stars is clueless about the publishing industry and what is ethical, or he’s just tactless. Sometimes a legitimate review will be written by a colleague, such as “I have known Barbara for fifteen years and I know her business advice works because….” But I’ve also seen ones that say things like, “This book is a lot of fun because it describes the places the author and I used to hang out as kids when we were growing up.” That’s great but it’s not a reason why anyone who isn’t friends with the author should read the book.

Be skeptical of totally positive reviews. Okay, don’t be totally skeptical, but beyond the “Best book ever” and “a wonderful, compelling story” comments, look for signs that the positive review is legitimate-discussions of the characters and plot that make it clear the book was read. After all, there are good books out there that deserve positive reviews. Don’t be satisfied with “This wonderful story” but look for explanations of why the story is wonderful.

Be skeptical of totally negative reviews.Some reviewers and customers have axes to grind. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen one-star reviews given at online bookstores because “the book never arrived.” That’s the fault of the bookstore’s delivery system, not the author or book’s fault. At other times, a person may just not like the author so he wants to slam the book, or he may not like the subject matter, saying something like, “Homosexuality is a sin and there’s a gay couple in this book so I gave it one star” or “The main character had an abortion. That’s wrong! One star.” You may even agree with the reviewers on these issues but are these reviews really fair? Do they take into account the book’s plot, characters, structure, style, originality, or themes to provide a thorough or accurate review?

Watch out for plot summaries.A book review is not an elementary school book report. Yes, there are lots of readers out there posting book reviews who don’t know how to write well or how to write a book review, but there are also phony reviewers who simply copy the text off the back cover that summarizes the plot to write a review. A good review will mention a detail in the plot or even quote an effective passage from the book. It will also tell you not only what happens in the book but how the reader felt (was moved) by what happened.

If a review looks like a fake, look to see what other books the person has reviewed. Are all the person’s reviews short and glowing? It’s possible this one review could just be a badly written, fake-looking one while other reviews look well-written and are legitimate. Has the reviewer posted more than one book review today, or been posting several every day? (Seriously, how many books can a person read in a week?) And don’t be afraid to google the reviewer to see whether you can find complaints about him or her online.

What can you do about fake reviews?

Now that you know how to spot a fake review, and even that fake reviews exist, you may feel a bit outraged-I know I do. So what can you do about such reviews? Here are a few suggestions:

If you are an author and you get a fake review, call the reviewer on it-especially if you paid for a review. But even if the person reviews the book by his own decision, without having contact with you, if the review is fake, you can request that the website where the review is posted remove the review. Decide whether the situation is worth getting into an argument with the phony reviewer. Will the review hurt your book’s credibility? If it is negative but shows evidence that the book was not read, it might. You might also feel called upon to fight the good fight for the rest of the authors out there who could suffer as a result of the reviewer’s behavior.

If you are a reader, check to see verification of purchase, which is sometimes a feature at various online bookstores. If the person bought the book, it’s likely he or she read it. That said, remember that reviewers generally receive complimentary copies. However, to get around this situation, I know some authors have requested reviewers purchase their books at online bookstores and then have compensated the author for the cost of the book so a purchase verification notice shows up on the review.

If you are an author or a reader, often at online bookstores you can vote on whether the review was helpful or not, so go ahead and click that NO button. This form of voting helps determine the placement of the review as at the top or bottom of the reviews so it is more or less likely to be seen by others. And don’t forget to vote YES for the well-written positive reviews, or even the well-written legitimate negative reviews.

Fake reviews do not help anyone except for the fake reviewers who write them. Even glowing fake reviews hurt authors and readers by getting people to buy books that turn out to be mediocre, which only then result in readers feeling misled and hurt and more likely to write their own negative reviews. Avoid phony reviewers and you will avoid a lot of frustration.